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Atlanta's Pottery Center.
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See MudFire at Avondale's Autumnfest October 4th and 5th!
Jerry Maschinot

Jerry Maschinot

Jerry Maschinot uses a unique slow-fire raku process with intense raku lustre glazes. He developed innovative methods of applying these glazes in layers, with inert materials mixed in to guide the flow and density of the liquid glaze across the surface of the bisque-fired pot. The serendipitous effects of his approach heighten surface variations to a degree that even one piece can be almost endlessly fascinating. The work is fired a large custom kiln of his design, breaking with conventional wisdom by slowing the firing down to several hours while carefully managing the reduction of oxygen levels to match the glazes used on each piece.

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Jerry Maschinot at MudFire

Two studio show Heavenly Vessels, June 2005
Solo show Delighted, June 2004
Solo show Raku: The Next 20 Years, June 2003

 

About Jerry Maschinot

Jerry Maschinot is one of the Southeast's premiere ceramic artists. He has shown his raku-fired work at juried and invitational exhibitions for over two decades, winning numerous prestigious awards along the way. He has repeatedly won the Award of Excellence at the Arts Festival of Atlanta, shown his work in the American Craft Council shows, and has been honored in exhibitions as far away as Kyoto, Japan. Jerry's work has been collected by noted American artists Ed Moulthrop and Mark Lindquist, and can be found in many corporate collections including Duke University, Delta Airlines, Hyatt Hotels, E.F. Hutton, Southern Accents Magazine, and the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation.

Jerry Maschinot uses a unique slow-fire raku process with intense raku lustre glazes that he developed in recent years. He has developed innovative methods of applying these glazes in layers, with inert materials mixed in to guide the flow and density of the liquid glaze across the thirsty surface of the bisque-fired pot. The serendipitous effects of his approach heighten surface variations to a degree that even one piece can be almost endlessly fascinating. Jerry fires the work in a large custom kiln of his design, breaking with conventional wisdom by slowing the firing down to several hours while carefully managing the reduction of oxygen levels to match the glazes used on each piece.

In the end, his pots hypnotize, lush with striking colors that swirl and drip across the surface in a wild storm.